Review of Tom Naughton's "Fathead" Documentary Film

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Continuing on the documentary food review trail I recently sat down to review the film “Fat Head”. This film refutes Morgan Spurlock’s “Supersize Me”. This is a film mixed with a few quality facts and a lot of frustrated diatribe.

Continuing on the documentary food review trail I recently sat down to review the film “Fat Head”. This film refutes Morgan Spurlock’s “Supersize Me”. Released in 2009 and directed by Tom Naughton, this film seeks to prove you can lose weight on a fast food diet. This is a film mixed with a few quality facts and a lot of frustrated diatribe.

The claim one fourth of the American adult public is obese is shown inaccurate by the definition of obesity being lessened over time with a body fat ratio of 31%. He refutes Spurlock’s drive for audience in”Supersize Me” by consuming 5,000 calories a day without looking at the possibility of losing weight by balancing fast food without taking it to the extreme.

Tom Naughton hangs around McDonald’s during the first act of the film. He does this to emphasize the points of free choice that all Americans have to eat fast food. The main problem I have with this is the absurdity of the notion as well as the lack of acknowledging that the subsidized food economy makes corn and thusly fast food cheaper than most healthy options dollar for dollar.

This film trails off terrible into minority studies, crime, consumer groups, and other frustrated diatribe. Some good medical information from interviewees are suitable and provide some good background but the viewer is again turned off by the condescending narrative.

“Fathead” carries an arrogance that I did not feel was compulsory to an agreement with the producer which was unusual barrier to get over to enjoy or want to learn from the film. The injection of similar humor was off putting at times when trying to convey an important message of any kind. Research is minimal and the film is more dialogue filled than evidence based on the whole

A visit to the film’s web site provides further testimonials and evidence to support the claims of the producer since the film debuted. More cartoons and exaggerated comedy based on his notions are presented there as well.

Tom ends up walking six nights a week which is something more people should strive to do. This activity does however burn more calories than the average fast food customer would on average and this is a fatal fault of the intended point of the film. Naughton makes some positive suggestions to thinking through your nutrition but really wastes a lot of viewer time voicing his opposition to “Supersize Me”.

Overall the film serves to make a point but does so in a tongue and cheek manner that is tough to swallow. The claims may have some basis in fact but I felt more like I was watching an MTV show from the 1990’s than a documentary intended to make more than a few salient points that could have fit in a half hour exposé program.

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Danny Hauger